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Category: Samson Dubina

Samson Dubina: Devastate the One-Wing Looper

samson2If your opponent’s primary shot is an extreme topspin attack, he is considered a looper. Loopers can play far from the table or close to the table; some loopers are penholders while others use the shakehands grip, some loop from both forehand and backhand and some just forehand. In this article, I’m going to describe the opponent who loops with just his forehand.

Samson Dubina: The Tactical Mind

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Just like any other table tennis skills, developing a tactical mindset takes discipline. As I work through the various styles over the coming weeks and teach you how to play against various opponents, I want you to understand that you too can think of your own tactics. I’m not very smart, I’m just an average guy. However, I do spend quality time thinking. You too can develop this same discipline

Samson Dubina: Devastate the Offensive Blocker

samson2 There are many different types of choppers; however, I’m going to lump all the choppers together
into two categories – offensive choppers and defensive choppers. Today, I’ll be talking about the offensive chopper, he likes to go back from the table, chopping with pips on his backhand, while fishing and counterlooping with his forehand. Even though he is away from the table, he is looking for the opportunity to move in and smash with his backhand or loop with his forehand. He wins about half of his points with consistency and half with his power shots

Samson Dubina: Bad Strokes?

samson2In order to get the timing correct, it is important that you move into position quickly so that you aren’t diving at the ball.  The longer the racket stay in front of your body, the easier it is to “time” the ball.  If you take your racket back too quickly and wait for 1.5 seconds in your backswing, then you are likely to whiff the ball, especially against a long-pips-type floating shot.

Samson Dubina: Targeting the Transition

samson2Over and over again, I hear coaches at tournaments wisely reminding their students about the importance of ball placement, especially placement to the middle transition ball to jam the opponent. However, these same coaches never give their students SPECIFIC drills in the training hall to help to learn to find the middle and attack the middle. In this article, I’m going to give you the reasons for attacking the middle then a few drills that might help you get started.

Samson Dubina: Fix It or Trash It

samson2I would recommend fixing a particular stroke when it is a core aspect of winning.  Let’s examine one of your previous matches…   In last tournament, you were in the finals of the u2100 event.  Your opponent kept serving long.  If you blocked or pushed his serve, he followed-up with a deadly smash.  When you tried to loop the serve, you were missing most of your loops long against his heavy sidespin-topspin long serve.  Fix it or trash it?

Samson Dubina: Follow the Example of Sarah Jalli

samson2When I coached table tennis in a school program, I was coaching up to 90 kids per day.  Over the last 20 years, I have seen thousands of kids play (or attempt to play) table tennis.  Sarah Jalli is one of my top juniors and recently went up 1000 rating points in 10 months and is now ranked #4 in the US for her age.  With the right environment and a great work ethic, Sarah definitely has Olympic potential.  So why is it that some kids rise to the top and others stay at the lower level?

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